Rules don’t apply to politicians

Saturday, the DC area had a major snowstorm, with up to 23 inches of snow in most areas.  The Virginia Department of Transportation responded to over 2900 accidents; I don’t have figures on the District and Maryland.

Governors of both Maryland and Virginia asked people to stay off the roads.  DON’T GO OUT.  Nowhere in the warnings did I see “unless you’re a politician.”

But Barbara Mikulski and Benjamin Cardin of Maryland are proud of the fact they went to the Capitol for a vote that could have been taken later.  Jim Webb and Mark Warner “braved the elements” — (“Webb, who lives in Falls Church, used his Jeep to plow through the snow, his office said.“) To vote on a bill that no one but the politicians want — that is really the pet project of  a few senators (see how Sen Nelson held things up — and he is only one person.)

Braving the elements is not the honorable thing to do here, folks.

What’s the hurry?   Were the politicians so worried they’d lose a vote if they waited until streets were clear?  Maybe that should tell them something.

I guess THEY don’t have to listen to governors.  After all, they’re the elite.

Stupid, and unimaginative — but he’s a politician

I wrote Senator Warner about Holder’s nomination as AG — prior to the vote.  I can’t think of too many people who are less concerned with maintaining the people’s rights under the Constitution than Holder, and both his role in the Mark Rich pardon and his stance on the Heller case would have been show-stoppers had I been voting.

See my Jan 26 post.  Does this sound familiar?

Dear Ms. xxxxxx,

Thank you for contacting me regarding the nomination of Eric H. Holder, Jr. to serve as the next Attorney General.  I appreciate your thoughts on this matter.

Article II, Section 2 of the United States Constitution provides that the President “shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint.Officers of the United States..”  As a former Chief Executive, I respect the constitutional authority and prerogative of the President, regardless of party, to select nominees for the executive branch who he believes will best serve the interest of the American people.  I also take very seriously the Senate’s constitutional duty to render advice and consent on Presidential nominations.

On January 28, 2009, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted 17-2 in favor of Mr. Holder’s nomination, and on February 2, 2009, the full Senate confirmed his nomination by a vote of 75-21, with my support.

Again, thank you for writing.  As we move forward in the 111th Congress, please continue to be in touch with your opinions and concerns.

Sincerely,
MARK R. WARNER
United States Senator

In other words, Mark Warner will rubber stamp the president’s decisions, and he uses a form letter to tell you so.

Sen. Warner fits right in

I have contacted Senators Webb and Warner three times already in the 111th Congress.  I urged them to do the right thing and oppose the nominations of Clinton and Salazar (per Article 1, Section VI, Para 2), and to oppose Holder on the grounds that he doesn’t understand civil liberties.

Warner hit the Democratic ground running, and showed why he’s a politician (emphasis and comments, of course, are mine):

Thank you for contacting me regarding President Obama’s nominees to serve in the executive branch.  I appreciate your thoughts on this matter.

Article II, Section 2 of the United States Consititution [duh, yeah, I obviously read the Constitution, since I quoted the article which disqualifies Clinton and Salazar] provides that the President “shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint…Officers of the United States….”  As a former Chief Executive [politician speak — Regard me highly for I am he], I respect the constitutional authority and prerogative of the President, regardless of party, to select nominees for the executive branch who he believes will best serve the interest [so why select Holder?] of the American people.  I, also, take very seriously the Senate’s constitutional duty to render advice and consent on these nominations [if so, you would realize your duty to advise this is unconstitutional, despite the parliamentary games and the fact it’s been done before].

Again, thank you for writing.  I will be sure to keep your thoughts in mind when these nominations reach the full Senate for consideration [He expects me to believe this?].

Three paragraphs to say nothing but “shut up and color”.

He’s the junior Senator.  He has to play “Mother, May I?” to some degree.  I had higher hopes.

At least he responded.  That’s more than Webb usually does.